Archived Webinars

Reasonable Accommodation – The Employer Should Have Known

Tuesday, Dec 20th – 2 p.m. Eastern

Way back in the year 2015 participants in our webinar series were alerted to the ADA Title I reasonable accommodation concept of “the employer should have known.” At that time two federal court cases signaled an expansion of employer responsibilities relative to reasonable accommodation. The October 2016 decision in Kowitz v. Trinity Health, No. 15-1584 (8th Cir. 2016) further clarifies the arguments on both sides of this still murky disability management concept.

Join Roy Matheson at 2 p.m. eastern on Tuesday, December 20, 2016 as he explores potential changes to line supervisor and disability manager best practices in the area of recognizing a request for reasonable accommodation.

Managing Reasonable Accommodation in a Large Group Setting

Aired on November 9, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

High production facilities often attempt to create a single job title for a huge group of employees. Join us for a study of group essential functions, production standards, and reasonable accommodation.

The Impact of ADA Title I Medical Examinations on Reasonable Accommodation

Aired on October 12, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

The process of hiring or returning to work an individual who has physician-issued medical restrictions creates an overlay of responsibility for the human resource team. Quite often medical restrictions constitute a non-verbalized yet valid communication of a request for accommodation. In some cases the existence of a restriction creates “the employer should have known” accountability. Join Roy and his special guest to explore what constitutes a valid request and what triggers an employer’s responsibility to know.

Pregnancy: The “On Your Own” Disability

Aired on September 14, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

“The Supreme Court decided many years ago that a pregnant employee is solely responsible for making decisions that affect her ability to continue her job” said Jim Sacher, EEOC’s regional attorney in Houston. “An employer that imposes its own personal beliefs and concerns about an employee’s pregnancy on her violates federal law and invites legal action.” Join Roy and his guest for a briefing on this important topic.

Tips for Accommodating Applicants and Temporary Employees

Aired on August 10, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

This webinar explores the nuances of a successful response to a request for reasonable accommodation from a job applicant, a “temporary employee”, or a former employee desiring to return to the workplace. Roy will draw on current EEOC and federal court cases to illustrate how to use his checklist of best practices when navigating these sometimes difficult requests.

What Employers Need to Know About “Direct Threat” and “Regarded As”

Aired on July 13, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

Ambiguous definitions, incomplete information, and lack of due process result in costly adverse employment decisions. Join us for the exploration of two often confusing concepts from Title I of the amended Americans with Disabilities Act.

PDF: Matheson What Employers Need to Know Direct Threat Regarded As July 2016

Effectively Using Leave as an Accommodation

Aired on June 8, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

Requests for leave at the FMLA to ADA transition, requests for intermittent leave, and requests for a revised daily schedule are factors contributing to the often complicated world of leave and schedule management.

Refusing a Reasonable Accommodation Request

Aired on May 11, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

Tenured university professors, software designers, physicians, and electrical engineers are but a few of the highly skilled knowledge workers with invisible disabilities. Often extremely reluctant to disclose their disabilities, it takes a special mix of practical knowledge and experience to manage requests for accommodation at this level.

On the Spectrum: Autism and Learning Disabilities in the Workplace

Aired on April 13, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

Tenured university professors, software designers, physicians, and electrical engineers are but a few of the highly skilled knowledge workers with invisible disabilities. Often extremely reluctant to disclose their disabilities, it takes a special mix of practical knowledge and experience to manage requests for accommodation at this level.

Open Forum: Accommodating Your Questions and Answers

Aired on March 23, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

Now is the time to ask your ADA Title I questions! Join Roy Matheson as he responds to topics that are of high interest to you.

Are you Inclusive? Companies Leading by Example

Aired on February 10, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

Large, nimble companies devoted to accommodation and inclusion demonstrate how to go beyond mere compliance.

Roy’s Top Ten Case List: 2015 Year in Review

Aired on January 13, 2016 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

We start the year with a look back at a series of reasonable accommodation settlements that provide valuable lessons and guidance.

Part II – Understanding the Basics of the Employment Law Related to FMLA, ADA and WC

Aired on December 9, 2015 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

This is the second in a two-part series; part one was presented on November 11th and will be available for viewing.
In order for the employer to meet its obligation under FMLA, ADA and WC, it is critical that situations be analyzed through the eyes of each law separately. Join Sheryl Ellis, PHR/CA, SHRM-CP, ADAC for a look at an organized approach to method for reducing compliance and administrative headaches while increasing your focus on the employee/employer relationship through the interactive process.

Part I – Understanding the Basics of the Employment Law Related to FMLA, ADA and WC

Aired on November 11, 2015 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

This is the first in a two-part series; join us on December 9th for part two.
Understanding the basics of the employment law related to FMLA, ADA and WC is essential as these three statutory schemes often overlap and appear to conflict. Join Sheryl Ellis, PHR/CA, SHRM-CP, ADAC for a review of the areas you need to pay attention to when applying these laws to leave and reasonable accommodation situations.

The Medical Center Disadvantage – Systemic ADA Title I Challenges

Aired on October 14, 2015 – 2:00 -3:00 pm EST

Inertia, old habits, the aging workforce, a “growing” customer base, and mistaking FMLA for ADA Title I are on the short list of challenges faced by human resource professionals in the medical center environment. Join Roy Matheson and Kathy Langford, OT/L, Ergonomic Analyst at St. Mary’s Medical Center in Grand Junction, CO as they discuss these challenges and successes they have encountered creating and administering a successful program.

Anatomy of an EEOC Charge: An Insider’s View

Aired on September 9, 2015 – 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST

Obtain an insider’s view on the EEOC investigation process, from the moment a charge is filed through the settlement process. Join Amber Cheek, JD, Disability Inclusion and ADA Compliance Manager at the University of Missouri and Roy Matheson, founder and CEO of ReasonableAccommodation.com as they walk you through the process of working with investigators, responding to requests, dealing with on-site investigations and participating in mediation. This webinar includes basic discussion of how the EEOC works, how EEOC “strategic priorities” effect charge dismissals, how investigation and mediation work, and what managers can do to assist the investigator to resolve charges.

Sponsored by:

holland

 

 

Getting Started: Launching Your Reasonable Accommodation Program

Aired on August 12, 2015 – 2:00 – 3:00pm EST

One of the toughest challenges faced by an overburdened human resource professional is organizing and launching an effective reasonable accommodation program. Where does one get the education, support, and structure needed to launch a new program or heal an existing one? Join Roy Matheson as he identifies the landmarks on the road toward a well-run, successful program.

The Role of the Ergonomist in Reasonable Accommodation

Aired on July 8, 2015 – 2pm ET

Reasonable Accommodation Identification and Undue Hardship Analysis are two fast growing services created by enforcement of Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act. In their desire to promptly respond to requests for accommodation, human resource professionals are reaching out to those in the community who have the skills to facilitate compliance in these areas.

Drawing on his long track record of work in these areas, Guest Speaker Jim Dewees, MS, CPE will share his perspective about the role of the ergonomic professional in becoming the “go to” compliance resource in a community.

How Much is too Much: A Systematic Approach to Defending an Undue Hardship Decision

Aired on June 17, 2015 – 2pm ET

The legal concept of “undue hardship” comes to us from Title I of the ADAAA. The concept was intended to recognize that some accommodations are not reasonable. Of all the concepts in the law, it remains one of the least defined and most difficult to consistently interpret. The code says an undue hardship is “an action requiring significant difficulty or expense”. While “significant difficulty” or “significant expense” in the eye of an employer may be quite different than in the eye of an EEOC investigator, quantification and justification of an undue hardship decision in response to a request for reasonable accommodation seems to fall solely on the shoulders of the human resources absence manager.

Join Roy Matheson as he reviews federal court and EEOC decisions that provide guidance toward making an equitable and defendable undue hardship decision.

Accommodating What You Can’t See: Reasonable Accommodations for “Invisible Disabilities”

Aired on May 13, 2015 – 2pm ET

Providing an effective and safe reasonable accommodation for the “unseen” disability is often a daunting process. Learning disabilities, chronic pain, dyslexia, moderate depression, and allergies affect the population at large and our colleagues. The difficult communications that often accompany the discussion of these potentially stigmatizing disabilities, joined with the assumption of a lack of availability of an effective and affordable accommodation, creates unneeded difficulty when managing these requests.

Join Roy Matheson and Amber Cheek, JD as they explore recent real world examples of successful accommodation of unseen disabilities.

ADA Title I: Applying the Tools Available to Employers (Part 3 of 3)

Aired on April 8, 2015 – 2pm ET

One of the ways human resource, safety, and risk management departments exercise leadership in a company, school, or government agency is by effective use of the tools provided by Title I of the ADAAA. Hiring, training, and maintaining an effective workforce (while minimizing the number of days lost to absence) is made easier once recognition, understanding, and application of the tools occur throughout the workplace. Many of the tools complement initiatives such as ergonomic evaluation and workplace wellness.

Join Roy and his invited guests as they conclude this three part series by exploring recent real world examples of application of Title I to its full potential.

ADA Title I: Understanding the Tools Available to Employers (Part 2 of 3)

Aired on March 11, 2015 – 2pm ET

The Congress of the United States, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Federal Courts have shaped the intended and legal application of the informed hiring, reasonable accommodation, return-to-work, and stay-at-work tools available to employers under Title I of the amended ADA. Part two of this three part webinar series supports understanding the intended use of each tool available under the law.

Join Roy as he explores the path of recognizing, understanding, and applying each tool at its full potential.

ADA Title I: Recognizing the Tools Available to Employers (Part 1 of 3)

Aired on February 11, 2015 – 2pm ET

Title I of the amended Americans with Disabilities Act is laden with informed hiring, reasonable accommodation, return-to-work, and stay-at-work tools. This free webinar series walks you through the process of recognizing, understanding, and applying the tools to typical and unusual work disability cases.

Join Roy as he “peels the onion” to recognize the tools that lead to the use of Title I at its full potential.

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